Planar laser induced fluorescence for temperature measurement of optical thermocavitation

D. Banks, V. Robles, B. Zhang, L. F. Devia-Cruz, S. Camacho-Lopez, G. Aguilar

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

1 Cita (Scopus)

Resumen

Pulsed laser-induced cavitation, has been the subject of many studies describing bubble growth, collapse and ensuing shock waves. To a lesser extent, hydrodynamics of continuous wave (CW) cavitation or thermocavitation have also been reported. However, the temperature field around these bubbles has not been measured, partly because a sensor placed in the fluid would interfere with the bubble dynamics, but also because the short-lived bubble lifetimes (∼70–200 µs) demand high sampling rates which are costly to achieve via infrared (IR) imaging. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) provides a non-intrusive alternative technique to costly IR imaging to measure the temperature around laser-induced cavitation bubbles. A 440 nm laser sheet excites rhodamine-B dye to fluoresce while thermocavitation is induced by a CW 810 nm laser. Post-calibration, the fluorescence intensity captured with a high-speed Phantom Miro camera is correlated to temperature field adjacent to the bubble. Using shadowgraphy and PLIF, a significant decrease in sensible heat is observed in the nucleation site– temperature decreases after bubble collapse and the initial heated volume of liquid shrinks. Based on irradiation time and temperature, the provided optical energy is estimated to be converted up to 50% into acoustic energy based on the bubble's size, with larger bubbles converting larger percentages.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)385-393
Número de páginas9
PublicaciónExperimental Thermal and Fluid Science
Volumen103
DOI
EstadoPublicada - may 2019

Huella dactilar

Temperature measurement
Fluorescence
Cavitation
Lasers
rhodamine B
Infrared imaging
Bubbles (in fluids)
Temperature distribution
Pulsed lasers
Shock waves
Temperature
Nucleation
Coloring Agents
Hydrodynamics
Dyes
Acoustics
Cameras
Irradiation
Calibration
Sampling

Citar esto

@article{6f8fa5e751a74828942e6088b98b7e71,
title = "Planar laser induced fluorescence for temperature measurement of optical thermocavitation",
abstract = "Pulsed laser-induced cavitation, has been the subject of many studies describing bubble growth, collapse and ensuing shock waves. To a lesser extent, hydrodynamics of continuous wave (CW) cavitation or thermocavitation have also been reported. However, the temperature field around these bubbles has not been measured, partly because a sensor placed in the fluid would interfere with the bubble dynamics, but also because the short-lived bubble lifetimes (∼70–200 µs) demand high sampling rates which are costly to achieve via infrared (IR) imaging. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) provides a non-intrusive alternative technique to costly IR imaging to measure the temperature around laser-induced cavitation bubbles. A 440 nm laser sheet excites rhodamine-B dye to fluoresce while thermocavitation is induced by a CW 810 nm laser. Post-calibration, the fluorescence intensity captured with a high-speed Phantom Miro camera is correlated to temperature field adjacent to the bubble. Using shadowgraphy and PLIF, a significant decrease in sensible heat is observed in the nucleation site– temperature decreases after bubble collapse and the initial heated volume of liquid shrinks. Based on irradiation time and temperature, the provided optical energy is estimated to be converted up to 50{\%} into acoustic energy based on the bubble's size, with larger bubbles converting larger percentages.",
keywords = "Acoustic dissipation, Laser-induced cavitation, Shadowgraph imaging",
author = "D. Banks and V. Robles and B. Zhang and Devia-Cruz, {L. F.} and S. Camacho-Lopez and G. Aguilar",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2019.01.030",
language = "Ingl{\'e}s",
volume = "103",
pages = "385--393",
journal = "Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science",
issn = "0894-1777",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

Planar laser induced fluorescence for temperature measurement of optical thermocavitation. / Banks, D.; Robles, V.; Zhang, B.; Devia-Cruz, L. F.; Camacho-Lopez, S.; Aguilar, G.

En: Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science, Vol. 103, 05.2019, p. 385-393.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Planar laser induced fluorescence for temperature measurement of optical thermocavitation

AU - Banks, D.

AU - Robles, V.

AU - Zhang, B.

AU - Devia-Cruz, L. F.

AU - Camacho-Lopez, S.

AU - Aguilar, G.

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - Pulsed laser-induced cavitation, has been the subject of many studies describing bubble growth, collapse and ensuing shock waves. To a lesser extent, hydrodynamics of continuous wave (CW) cavitation or thermocavitation have also been reported. However, the temperature field around these bubbles has not been measured, partly because a sensor placed in the fluid would interfere with the bubble dynamics, but also because the short-lived bubble lifetimes (∼70–200 µs) demand high sampling rates which are costly to achieve via infrared (IR) imaging. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) provides a non-intrusive alternative technique to costly IR imaging to measure the temperature around laser-induced cavitation bubbles. A 440 nm laser sheet excites rhodamine-B dye to fluoresce while thermocavitation is induced by a CW 810 nm laser. Post-calibration, the fluorescence intensity captured with a high-speed Phantom Miro camera is correlated to temperature field adjacent to the bubble. Using shadowgraphy and PLIF, a significant decrease in sensible heat is observed in the nucleation site– temperature decreases after bubble collapse and the initial heated volume of liquid shrinks. Based on irradiation time and temperature, the provided optical energy is estimated to be converted up to 50% into acoustic energy based on the bubble's size, with larger bubbles converting larger percentages.

AB - Pulsed laser-induced cavitation, has been the subject of many studies describing bubble growth, collapse and ensuing shock waves. To a lesser extent, hydrodynamics of continuous wave (CW) cavitation or thermocavitation have also been reported. However, the temperature field around these bubbles has not been measured, partly because a sensor placed in the fluid would interfere with the bubble dynamics, but also because the short-lived bubble lifetimes (∼70–200 µs) demand high sampling rates which are costly to achieve via infrared (IR) imaging. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) provides a non-intrusive alternative technique to costly IR imaging to measure the temperature around laser-induced cavitation bubbles. A 440 nm laser sheet excites rhodamine-B dye to fluoresce while thermocavitation is induced by a CW 810 nm laser. Post-calibration, the fluorescence intensity captured with a high-speed Phantom Miro camera is correlated to temperature field adjacent to the bubble. Using shadowgraphy and PLIF, a significant decrease in sensible heat is observed in the nucleation site– temperature decreases after bubble collapse and the initial heated volume of liquid shrinks. Based on irradiation time and temperature, the provided optical energy is estimated to be converted up to 50% into acoustic energy based on the bubble's size, with larger bubbles converting larger percentages.

KW - Acoustic dissipation

KW - Laser-induced cavitation

KW - Shadowgraph imaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060916964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2019.01.030

DO - 10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2019.01.030

M3 - Artículo

AN - SCOPUS:85060916964

VL - 103

SP - 385

EP - 393

JO - Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science

JF - Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science

SN - 0894-1777

ER -