Mechanisms of insecticide resistance in field populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) from Quintana Roo, Southern Mexico

Adriana E. Flores, Jaime Salomon Grajales, Ildefonso Fernandez Salas, Gustavo Ponce Garcia, Ma Haydee Loaiza Becerra, Saul Lozano, William G. Brogdon, William C. Black IV, Barry Beaty

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

53 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms were studied with the use of biochemical assays in Aedes aegypti (L.) collected from 5 municipalities representing the north part of Quintana Roo: Benito Juarez, Cozumel, IsIa Mujeres, Lazaro Cardenas, and Solidaridad. The activities of α and β esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), acethylcholinesterase (AChE), and insensitive acethylcholinesterase (iAChE) were assayed in microplates. Three replicates were performed for each enzyme and 60 males and 60 females were analyzed in each population. The New Orleans (NO) susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti was used as a susceptible reference and the threshold criteria for each enzyme were the highest NO absorbance values. In none of the 6 tests were absorbance values correlated in males and females, α esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Lazaro Cardenas males and females, β esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Cozumel and Lazaro Cardenas males. Elevated esterases suggest potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms against organophosphate, carbamate, and some pyrethroid insecticides. Slightly elevated levels of MFOs appeared in Lazaro Cardenas females and in Cozumel, Isla Mujeres, and Solidaridad males. Mechanisms involving iAChE or GST were not apparent.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)672-677
Número de páginas6
PublicaciónJournal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Volumen22
N.º4
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 dic 2006

Huella dactilar

Insecticide Resistance
Aedes
insecticide resistance
Mexico
Aedes aegypti
insecticide
Esterases
esterases
Population
Glutathione Transferase
resistance mechanisms
absorbance
glutathione transferase
enzyme
mixed function oxidase
Pyrethrins
pyrethroid insecticides
Carbamates
carbamate (ester)
Organophosphates

Citar esto

Flores, Adriana E. ; Grajales, Jaime Salomon ; Salas, Ildefonso Fernandez ; Garcia, Gustavo Ponce ; Becerra, Ma Haydee Loaiza ; Lozano, Saul ; Brogdon, William G. ; Black IV, William C. ; Beaty, Barry. / Mechanisms of insecticide resistance in field populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) from Quintana Roo, Southern Mexico. En: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 2006 ; Vol. 22, N.º 4. pp. 672-677.
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abstract = "Potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms were studied with the use of biochemical assays in Aedes aegypti (L.) collected from 5 municipalities representing the north part of Quintana Roo: Benito Juarez, Cozumel, IsIa Mujeres, Lazaro Cardenas, and Solidaridad. The activities of α and β esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), acethylcholinesterase (AChE), and insensitive acethylcholinesterase (iAChE) were assayed in microplates. Three replicates were performed for each enzyme and 60 males and 60 females were analyzed in each population. The New Orleans (NO) susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti was used as a susceptible reference and the threshold criteria for each enzyme were the highest NO absorbance values. In none of the 6 tests were absorbance values correlated in males and females, α esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Lazaro Cardenas males and females, β esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Cozumel and Lazaro Cardenas males. Elevated esterases suggest potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms against organophosphate, carbamate, and some pyrethroid insecticides. Slightly elevated levels of MFOs appeared in Lazaro Cardenas females and in Cozumel, Isla Mujeres, and Solidaridad males. Mechanisms involving iAChE or GST were not apparent.",
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Mechanisms of insecticide resistance in field populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) from Quintana Roo, Southern Mexico. / Flores, Adriana E.; Grajales, Jaime Salomon; Salas, Ildefonso Fernandez; Garcia, Gustavo Ponce; Becerra, Ma Haydee Loaiza; Lozano, Saul; Brogdon, William G.; Black IV, William C.; Beaty, Barry.

En: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association, Vol. 22, N.º 4, 01.12.2006, p. 672-677.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanisms of insecticide resistance in field populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) from Quintana Roo, Southern Mexico

AU - Flores, Adriana E.

AU - Grajales, Jaime Salomon

AU - Salas, Ildefonso Fernandez

AU - Garcia, Gustavo Ponce

AU - Becerra, Ma Haydee Loaiza

AU - Lozano, Saul

AU - Brogdon, William G.

AU - Black IV, William C.

AU - Beaty, Barry

PY - 2006/12/1

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N2 - Potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms were studied with the use of biochemical assays in Aedes aegypti (L.) collected from 5 municipalities representing the north part of Quintana Roo: Benito Juarez, Cozumel, IsIa Mujeres, Lazaro Cardenas, and Solidaridad. The activities of α and β esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), acethylcholinesterase (AChE), and insensitive acethylcholinesterase (iAChE) were assayed in microplates. Three replicates were performed for each enzyme and 60 males and 60 females were analyzed in each population. The New Orleans (NO) susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti was used as a susceptible reference and the threshold criteria for each enzyme were the highest NO absorbance values. In none of the 6 tests were absorbance values correlated in males and females, α esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Lazaro Cardenas males and females, β esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Cozumel and Lazaro Cardenas males. Elevated esterases suggest potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms against organophosphate, carbamate, and some pyrethroid insecticides. Slightly elevated levels of MFOs appeared in Lazaro Cardenas females and in Cozumel, Isla Mujeres, and Solidaridad males. Mechanisms involving iAChE or GST were not apparent.

AB - Potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms were studied with the use of biochemical assays in Aedes aegypti (L.) collected from 5 municipalities representing the north part of Quintana Roo: Benito Juarez, Cozumel, IsIa Mujeres, Lazaro Cardenas, and Solidaridad. The activities of α and β esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), acethylcholinesterase (AChE), and insensitive acethylcholinesterase (iAChE) were assayed in microplates. Three replicates were performed for each enzyme and 60 males and 60 females were analyzed in each population. The New Orleans (NO) susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti was used as a susceptible reference and the threshold criteria for each enzyme were the highest NO absorbance values. In none of the 6 tests were absorbance values correlated in males and females, α esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Lazaro Cardenas males and females, β esterases were elevated in Benito Juarez, Cozumel females and in Cozumel and Lazaro Cardenas males. Elevated esterases suggest potential insecticide-resistance mechanisms against organophosphate, carbamate, and some pyrethroid insecticides. Slightly elevated levels of MFOs appeared in Lazaro Cardenas females and in Cozumel, Isla Mujeres, and Solidaridad males. Mechanisms involving iAChE or GST were not apparent.

KW - Aedes aegypti

KW - Esterases

KW - Insecticide resistance

KW - Insecticide surveillance

KW - Permethrin

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JO - Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association

JF - Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association

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