Fossil flower of Staphylea L. from the Miocene amber of Mexico: New evidence of the Boreotropical Flora in low-latitude North America

Ana L. Hernández-Damián, Sergio Rafael silvestre Cevallos Ferriz, Alma R. Huerta-Vergara

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

1 Cita (Scopus)

Resumen

A new flower preserved in amber in sediments of Simojovel de Allende, México, is identified as an extinct member of Staphyleaceae, a family of angiosperms consisting of only three genera (Staphylea, Turpinia and Euscaphis), which has a large and abundant fossil record and is today distributed over the Northern Hemisphere. Staphylea ochoterenae sp. Nov. is the first record of a flower for this group, which is small, pedicelled, pentamer, bisexual, with sepals and petals with similar size, dorsifixed anthers and superior ovary. Furthermore, the presence of stamens with pubescent filaments allows close comparison with extant flowers of Staphylea bulmada and S. forresti, species currently growing in Asia. However, their different number of style (one vs. three) and the apparent lack of a floral disc distinguish them from S. ochoterenae. The presence of Staphyleaceae in southern Mexico ca. 23 to 15My ago is evidence of the long history of integration of vegetation in low-latitude North America, in which some lineages, such as Staphylea, could move southwards from high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, as part of the Boreotropical Flora. In Mexico it grew in association with tropical elements, as suggested by the fossil record of the area.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)471-478
Número de páginas8
PublicaciónEarth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh
Volumen108
N.º4
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 feb 2019

Huella dactilar

amber
flower
flora
Miocene
fossil
fossil record
Northern Hemisphere
angiosperm
vegetation
history
sediment
North America

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title = "Fossil flower of Staphylea L. from the Miocene amber of Mexico: New evidence of the Boreotropical Flora in low-latitude North America",
abstract = "A new flower preserved in amber in sediments of Simojovel de Allende, M{\'e}xico, is identified as an extinct member of Staphyleaceae, a family of angiosperms consisting of only three genera (Staphylea, Turpinia and Euscaphis), which has a large and abundant fossil record and is today distributed over the Northern Hemisphere. Staphylea ochoterenae sp. Nov. is the first record of a flower for this group, which is small, pedicelled, pentamer, bisexual, with sepals and petals with similar size, dorsifixed anthers and superior ovary. Furthermore, the presence of stamens with pubescent filaments allows close comparison with extant flowers of Staphylea bulmada and S. forresti, species currently growing in Asia. However, their different number of style (one vs. three) and the apparent lack of a floral disc distinguish them from S. ochoterenae. The presence of Staphyleaceae in southern Mexico ca. 23 to 15My ago is evidence of the long history of integration of vegetation in low-latitude North America, in which some lineages, such as Staphylea, could move southwards from high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, as part of the Boreotropical Flora. In Mexico it grew in association with tropical elements, as suggested by the fossil record of the area.",
keywords = "Neogene, Simojovel de Allende, Staphyleaceae, angiosperm, reproductive organ",
author = "Hern{\'a}ndez-Dami{\'a}n, {Ana L.} and {Cevallos Ferriz}, {Sergio Rafael silvestre} and Huerta-Vergara, {Alma R.}",
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language = "Ingl{\'e}s",
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pages = "471--478",
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Fossil flower of Staphylea L. from the Miocene amber of Mexico : New evidence of the Boreotropical Flora in low-latitude North America. / Hernández-Damián, Ana L.; Cevallos Ferriz, Sergio Rafael silvestre; Huerta-Vergara, Alma R.

En: Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. 108, N.º 4, 01.02.2019, p. 471-478.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fossil flower of Staphylea L. from the Miocene amber of Mexico

T2 - New evidence of the Boreotropical Flora in low-latitude North America

AU - Hernández-Damián, Ana L.

AU - Cevallos Ferriz, Sergio Rafael silvestre

AU - Huerta-Vergara, Alma R.

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - A new flower preserved in amber in sediments of Simojovel de Allende, México, is identified as an extinct member of Staphyleaceae, a family of angiosperms consisting of only three genera (Staphylea, Turpinia and Euscaphis), which has a large and abundant fossil record and is today distributed over the Northern Hemisphere. Staphylea ochoterenae sp. Nov. is the first record of a flower for this group, which is small, pedicelled, pentamer, bisexual, with sepals and petals with similar size, dorsifixed anthers and superior ovary. Furthermore, the presence of stamens with pubescent filaments allows close comparison with extant flowers of Staphylea bulmada and S. forresti, species currently growing in Asia. However, their different number of style (one vs. three) and the apparent lack of a floral disc distinguish them from S. ochoterenae. The presence of Staphyleaceae in southern Mexico ca. 23 to 15My ago is evidence of the long history of integration of vegetation in low-latitude North America, in which some lineages, such as Staphylea, could move southwards from high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, as part of the Boreotropical Flora. In Mexico it grew in association with tropical elements, as suggested by the fossil record of the area.

AB - A new flower preserved in amber in sediments of Simojovel de Allende, México, is identified as an extinct member of Staphyleaceae, a family of angiosperms consisting of only three genera (Staphylea, Turpinia and Euscaphis), which has a large and abundant fossil record and is today distributed over the Northern Hemisphere. Staphylea ochoterenae sp. Nov. is the first record of a flower for this group, which is small, pedicelled, pentamer, bisexual, with sepals and petals with similar size, dorsifixed anthers and superior ovary. Furthermore, the presence of stamens with pubescent filaments allows close comparison with extant flowers of Staphylea bulmada and S. forresti, species currently growing in Asia. However, their different number of style (one vs. three) and the apparent lack of a floral disc distinguish them from S. ochoterenae. The presence of Staphyleaceae in southern Mexico ca. 23 to 15My ago is evidence of the long history of integration of vegetation in low-latitude North America, in which some lineages, such as Staphylea, could move southwards from high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, as part of the Boreotropical Flora. In Mexico it grew in association with tropical elements, as suggested by the fossil record of the area.

KW - Neogene

KW - Simojovel de Allende

KW - Staphyleaceae

KW - angiosperm

KW - reproductive organ

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054952003&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1755691018000701

DO - 10.1017/S1755691018000701

M3 - Artículo

AN - SCOPUS:85054952003

VL - 108

SP - 471

EP - 478

JO - Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

JF - Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

SN - 1755-6910

IS - 4

ER -