Experimental comparison of heat flow through concrete roofing flagstones with different coatings

Jorge Lucero-Álvarez, Ignacio R. Martin-Dominguez, Francisco Rubín-Zacarías, Alfonso Ledezma-Gallegos, María T. Alarcón-Herrera

Resultado de la investigación: Capítulo del libro/informe/acta de congresoContribución a la conferencia

3 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

The predominant climate in most of Mexico is hot and sunny, divided between humid in the southern coastal areas and dry in the north. One of the most common materials used to build roofs today is reinforced concrete. This material allows a better use of the available space, but its thermal insulation characteristics are inadequate. This causes the levels of comfort inside the houses to be much worse than the minimum required. The current tendency to make better use of energy in buildings has led to the development of a new generation of roof coatings that offer a greater resistance to heat transfer. Thus, there is now a need for experimental mechanisms capable of evaluating the thermal behaviour of these products. In a hot and sunny climate, the effect of solar radiation reaching the roof is very important. In summer, under a clear sky, up to 1,000 W/m2 can reach the roof of any given house. Depending on the reflectivity of the roof surface, between 10% and 95% of the incident radiation is absorbed and converted to heat. This adds to the convective heat transfer generated by the temperature difference between the interior and exterior air. This work presents the results of a series of experiments in which 12 different roof coating systems commonly used in Mexico were subjected to identical operating conditions. For this, we built an experimental shed whose roof was designed to hold 12 concrete test-probes, insulated from each other, and coated with the substances to be tested. The coated test-probes were subject to the same exterior weather conditions, with the inside of the shed under constant airconditioning. Temperature measurements were taken on both faces of each slab, which made it possible to compare their heat transfer rates and thus the performance of each coating. The system was monitored over several weeks, with simultaneous measurements taken every two minutes. The results show that applying a few millimeter coating of white acrylic paint with polymer microspheres has the same effect as insulating the slab with 1" of polyurethane foam covered with conventional red acrylic paint. We also compared the heat flows obtained with the 12 different coatings during the day and night.

Idioma originalInglés
Título de la publicación alojada30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011
Páginas592-603
Número de páginas12
EstadoPublicada - 1 dic 2011
Evento30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011 - Kassel, Alemania
Duración: 28 ago 20112 sep 2011

Serie de la publicación

Nombre30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011
Volumen1

Otros

Otros30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011
PaísAlemania
CiudadKassel
Período28/08/112/09/11

Huella dactilar

Roofs
Concretes
Heat transfer
Coatings
Paint
Acrylics
Thermal insulation
Solar radiation
Microspheres
Temperature measurement
Polyurethanes
Reinforced concrete
Foams
Radiation
Polymers
Air
Experiments

Citar esto

Lucero-Álvarez, J., Martin-Dominguez, I. R., Rubín-Zacarías, F., Ledezma-Gallegos, A., & Alarcón-Herrera, M. T. (2011). Experimental comparison of heat flow through concrete roofing flagstones with different coatings. En 30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011 (pp. 592-603). (30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011; Vol. 1).
Lucero-Álvarez, Jorge ; Martin-Dominguez, Ignacio R. ; Rubín-Zacarías, Francisco ; Ledezma-Gallegos, Alfonso ; Alarcón-Herrera, María T. / Experimental comparison of heat flow through concrete roofing flagstones with different coatings. 30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011. 2011. pp. 592-603 (30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011).
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title = "Experimental comparison of heat flow through concrete roofing flagstones with different coatings",
abstract = "The predominant climate in most of Mexico is hot and sunny, divided between humid in the southern coastal areas and dry in the north. One of the most common materials used to build roofs today is reinforced concrete. This material allows a better use of the available space, but its thermal insulation characteristics are inadequate. This causes the levels of comfort inside the houses to be much worse than the minimum required. The current tendency to make better use of energy in buildings has led to the development of a new generation of roof coatings that offer a greater resistance to heat transfer. Thus, there is now a need for experimental mechanisms capable of evaluating the thermal behaviour of these products. In a hot and sunny climate, the effect of solar radiation reaching the roof is very important. In summer, under a clear sky, up to 1,000 W/m2 can reach the roof of any given house. Depending on the reflectivity of the roof surface, between 10{\%} and 95{\%} of the incident radiation is absorbed and converted to heat. This adds to the convective heat transfer generated by the temperature difference between the interior and exterior air. This work presents the results of a series of experiments in which 12 different roof coating systems commonly used in Mexico were subjected to identical operating conditions. For this, we built an experimental shed whose roof was designed to hold 12 concrete test-probes, insulated from each other, and coated with the substances to be tested. The coated test-probes were subject to the same exterior weather conditions, with the inside of the shed under constant airconditioning. Temperature measurements were taken on both faces of each slab, which made it possible to compare their heat transfer rates and thus the performance of each coating. The system was monitored over several weeks, with simultaneous measurements taken every two minutes. The results show that applying a few millimeter coating of white acrylic paint with polymer microspheres has the same effect as insulating the slab with 1{"} of polyurethane foam covered with conventional red acrylic paint. We also compared the heat flows obtained with the 12 different coatings during the day and night.",
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Lucero-Álvarez, J, Martin-Dominguez, IR, Rubín-Zacarías, F, Ledezma-Gallegos, A & Alarcón-Herrera, MT 2011, Experimental comparison of heat flow through concrete roofing flagstones with different coatings. En 30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011. 30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011, vol. 1, pp. 592-603, 30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011, Kassel, Alemania, 28/08/11.

Experimental comparison of heat flow through concrete roofing flagstones with different coatings. / Lucero-Álvarez, Jorge; Martin-Dominguez, Ignacio R.; Rubín-Zacarías, Francisco; Ledezma-Gallegos, Alfonso; Alarcón-Herrera, María T.

30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011. 2011. p. 592-603 (30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011; Vol. 1).

Resultado de la investigación: Capítulo del libro/informe/acta de congresoContribución a la conferencia

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AU - Lucero-Álvarez, Jorge

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AU - Rubín-Zacarías, Francisco

AU - Ledezma-Gallegos, Alfonso

AU - Alarcón-Herrera, María T.

PY - 2011/12/1

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N2 - The predominant climate in most of Mexico is hot and sunny, divided between humid in the southern coastal areas and dry in the north. One of the most common materials used to build roofs today is reinforced concrete. This material allows a better use of the available space, but its thermal insulation characteristics are inadequate. This causes the levels of comfort inside the houses to be much worse than the minimum required. The current tendency to make better use of energy in buildings has led to the development of a new generation of roof coatings that offer a greater resistance to heat transfer. Thus, there is now a need for experimental mechanisms capable of evaluating the thermal behaviour of these products. In a hot and sunny climate, the effect of solar radiation reaching the roof is very important. In summer, under a clear sky, up to 1,000 W/m2 can reach the roof of any given house. Depending on the reflectivity of the roof surface, between 10% and 95% of the incident radiation is absorbed and converted to heat. This adds to the convective heat transfer generated by the temperature difference between the interior and exterior air. This work presents the results of a series of experiments in which 12 different roof coating systems commonly used in Mexico were subjected to identical operating conditions. For this, we built an experimental shed whose roof was designed to hold 12 concrete test-probes, insulated from each other, and coated with the substances to be tested. The coated test-probes were subject to the same exterior weather conditions, with the inside of the shed under constant airconditioning. Temperature measurements were taken on both faces of each slab, which made it possible to compare their heat transfer rates and thus the performance of each coating. The system was monitored over several weeks, with simultaneous measurements taken every two minutes. The results show that applying a few millimeter coating of white acrylic paint with polymer microspheres has the same effect as insulating the slab with 1" of polyurethane foam covered with conventional red acrylic paint. We also compared the heat flows obtained with the 12 different coatings during the day and night.

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Lucero-Álvarez J, Martin-Dominguez IR, Rubín-Zacarías F, Ledezma-Gallegos A, Alarcón-Herrera MT. Experimental comparison of heat flow through concrete roofing flagstones with different coatings. En 30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011. 2011. p. 592-603. (30th ISES Biennial Solar World Congress 2011, SWC 2011).