Dynamics of soluble sugars and secondary metabolites in fruit of Juglans australis attacked by Anastrepha fraterculus and Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Luis Oroño, Martin Ramon Aluja Schuneman hofer, Sergio Ovruski, Juan Rull, Roque Interdonato, Fernando E. Prado, Mirna Hilal

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

Resumen

The development and fitness of phytophagous insects are tightly linked to the nutritional quality of their host plants and many studies have examined the influence of primary and secondary metabolites of plants and their effects on the development of insects. Herbivore tactics to modify plant metabolic pathways to lower host toxicity need to be better understood as they are critical to a better understanding of herbivore–host plant relationships. To contribute to this end, in this study we analyzed temporal patterns of glucose, sucrose, fructose, and total soluble sugar contents, as well as tannins, phenols, and flavonoids in the mesocarp of fruit of native walnut (Juglans australis), uninfested and infested by Anastrepha fraterculus and Ceratitis capitata (sometimes simultaneously in a single fruit). Both fly species are polyphagous tephritids whose larvae feed on a wide variety of hosts. We observed a high correlation between infestation and adult emergence of these two insects which was positive in the case of sugar content and negative in the case of toxic secondary metabolites in fruit. At particular ripening stages, infested fruit contained higher levels of sugars and lower levels of phenols and tannins than non-infested fruit. We discuss the possibility that A. fraterculus and C. capitata, each with different egg-laying strategies, may modify metabolical pathways in the fruit for their own benefit through larval activity with the help of bacteria in their gut. Alternatively, the patterns observed may be simple side effects of larval feeding and associated growth of opportunistic microorganisms.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)411-421
Número de páginas11
PublicaciónArthropod-Plant Interactions
Volumen13
N.º3
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 jun 2019

Huella dactilar

Anastrepha fraterculus
Juglans
Ceratitis capitata
secondary metabolite
Tephritidae
secondary metabolites
sugar
fruit
sugars
fruits
tannin
insect
phenols
sugar content
tannins
phenol
insect development
mesocarp
ripening
phytophagous insects

Citar esto

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title = "Dynamics of soluble sugars and secondary metabolites in fruit of Juglans australis attacked by Anastrepha fraterculus and Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)",
abstract = "The development and fitness of phytophagous insects are tightly linked to the nutritional quality of their host plants and many studies have examined the influence of primary and secondary metabolites of plants and their effects on the development of insects. Herbivore tactics to modify plant metabolic pathways to lower host toxicity need to be better understood as they are critical to a better understanding of herbivore–host plant relationships. To contribute to this end, in this study we analyzed temporal patterns of glucose, sucrose, fructose, and total soluble sugar contents, as well as tannins, phenols, and flavonoids in the mesocarp of fruit of native walnut (Juglans australis), uninfested and infested by Anastrepha fraterculus and Ceratitis capitata (sometimes simultaneously in a single fruit). Both fly species are polyphagous tephritids whose larvae feed on a wide variety of hosts. We observed a high correlation between infestation and adult emergence of these two insects which was positive in the case of sugar content and negative in the case of toxic secondary metabolites in fruit. At particular ripening stages, infested fruit contained higher levels of sugars and lower levels of phenols and tannins than non-infested fruit. We discuss the possibility that A. fraterculus and C. capitata, each with different egg-laying strategies, may modify metabolical pathways in the fruit for their own benefit through larval activity with the help of bacteria in their gut. Alternatively, the patterns observed may be simple side effects of larval feeding and associated growth of opportunistic microorganisms.",
keywords = "Herbivore manipulation, Herbivore offense, Nutritional content, Plant defense",
author = "Luis Oro{\~n}o and {Aluja Schuneman hofer}, {Martin Ramon} and Sergio Ovruski and Juan Rull and Roque Interdonato and Prado, {Fernando E.} and Mirna Hilal",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11829-018-9639-4",
language = "Ingl{\'e}s",
volume = "13",
pages = "411--421",
journal = "Arthropod-Plant Interactions",
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Dynamics of soluble sugars and secondary metabolites in fruit of Juglans australis attacked by Anastrepha fraterculus and Ceratitis capitata (Diptera : Tephritidae). / Oroño, Luis; Aluja Schuneman hofer, Martin Ramon; Ovruski, Sergio; Rull, Juan; Interdonato, Roque; Prado, Fernando E.; Hilal, Mirna.

En: Arthropod-Plant Interactions, Vol. 13, N.º 3, 01.06.2019, p. 411-421.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dynamics of soluble sugars and secondary metabolites in fruit of Juglans australis attacked by Anastrepha fraterculus and Ceratitis capitata (Diptera

T2 - Tephritidae)

AU - Oroño, Luis

AU - Aluja Schuneman hofer, Martin Ramon

AU - Ovruski, Sergio

AU - Rull, Juan

AU - Interdonato, Roque

AU - Prado, Fernando E.

AU - Hilal, Mirna

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - The development and fitness of phytophagous insects are tightly linked to the nutritional quality of their host plants and many studies have examined the influence of primary and secondary metabolites of plants and their effects on the development of insects. Herbivore tactics to modify plant metabolic pathways to lower host toxicity need to be better understood as they are critical to a better understanding of herbivore–host plant relationships. To contribute to this end, in this study we analyzed temporal patterns of glucose, sucrose, fructose, and total soluble sugar contents, as well as tannins, phenols, and flavonoids in the mesocarp of fruit of native walnut (Juglans australis), uninfested and infested by Anastrepha fraterculus and Ceratitis capitata (sometimes simultaneously in a single fruit). Both fly species are polyphagous tephritids whose larvae feed on a wide variety of hosts. We observed a high correlation between infestation and adult emergence of these two insects which was positive in the case of sugar content and negative in the case of toxic secondary metabolites in fruit. At particular ripening stages, infested fruit contained higher levels of sugars and lower levels of phenols and tannins than non-infested fruit. We discuss the possibility that A. fraterculus and C. capitata, each with different egg-laying strategies, may modify metabolical pathways in the fruit for their own benefit through larval activity with the help of bacteria in their gut. Alternatively, the patterns observed may be simple side effects of larval feeding and associated growth of opportunistic microorganisms.

AB - The development and fitness of phytophagous insects are tightly linked to the nutritional quality of their host plants and many studies have examined the influence of primary and secondary metabolites of plants and their effects on the development of insects. Herbivore tactics to modify plant metabolic pathways to lower host toxicity need to be better understood as they are critical to a better understanding of herbivore–host plant relationships. To contribute to this end, in this study we analyzed temporal patterns of glucose, sucrose, fructose, and total soluble sugar contents, as well as tannins, phenols, and flavonoids in the mesocarp of fruit of native walnut (Juglans australis), uninfested and infested by Anastrepha fraterculus and Ceratitis capitata (sometimes simultaneously in a single fruit). Both fly species are polyphagous tephritids whose larvae feed on a wide variety of hosts. We observed a high correlation between infestation and adult emergence of these two insects which was positive in the case of sugar content and negative in the case of toxic secondary metabolites in fruit. At particular ripening stages, infested fruit contained higher levels of sugars and lower levels of phenols and tannins than non-infested fruit. We discuss the possibility that A. fraterculus and C. capitata, each with different egg-laying strategies, may modify metabolical pathways in the fruit for their own benefit through larval activity with the help of bacteria in their gut. Alternatively, the patterns observed may be simple side effects of larval feeding and associated growth of opportunistic microorganisms.

KW - Herbivore manipulation

KW - Herbivore offense

KW - Nutritional content

KW - Plant defense

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DO - 10.1007/s11829-018-9639-4

M3 - Artículo

AN - SCOPUS:85056285470

VL - 13

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JO - Arthropod-Plant Interactions

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SN - 1872-8855

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