Antibody persistence in adults two years after vaccination with an H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus-like particle vaccine

Nuriban Valero-Pacheco, Marisol Pérez-Toledo, Miguel Ángel Villasís-Keever, Adriana Núñez-Valencia, Ilka Boscó-Gárate, Bernardo Lozano-Dubernard, Horacio Lara-Puente, Clara Espitia, Celia Alpuche-Aranda, Laura C. Bonifaz, Lourdes Arriaga-Pizano, Rodolfo Pastelin-Palacios, Armando Isibasi, Constantino López-Macías

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

12 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

Idioma originalInglés
Número de artículoe0150146
PublicaciónPLoS ONE
Volumen11
N.º2
DOI
EstadoPublicada - feb 2016

Huella dactilar

Virus-Like Particle Vaccines
virus-like particle vaccines
Influenza Vaccines
Pandemics
pandemic
Orthomyxoviridae
Viruses
Vaccination
influenza
vaccination
Human Influenza
antibodies
Antibodies
vaccines
virus-like particles
Vaccines
Antibody Formation
Disease Outbreaks
Ovum
Insects

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Valero-Pacheco, N., Pérez-Toledo, M., Villasís-Keever, M. Á., Núñez-Valencia, A., Boscó-Gárate, I., Lozano-Dubernard, B., ... López-Macías, C. (2016). Antibody persistence in adults two years after vaccination with an H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus-like particle vaccine. PLoS ONE, 11(2), [e0150146]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150146
Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban ; Pérez-Toledo, Marisol ; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel ; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana ; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka ; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo ; Lara-Puente, Horacio ; Espitia, Clara ; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia ; Bonifaz, Laura C. ; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes ; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo ; Isibasi, Armando ; López-Macías, Constantino. / Antibody persistence in adults two years after vaccination with an H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus-like particle vaccine. En: PLoS ONE. 2016 ; Vol. 11, N.º 2.
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title = "Antibody persistence in adults two years after vaccination with an H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus-like particle vaccine",
abstract = "The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.",
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Valero-Pacheco, N, Pérez-Toledo, M, Villasís-Keever, MÁ, Núñez-Valencia, A, Boscó-Gárate, I, Lozano-Dubernard, B, Lara-Puente, H, Espitia, C, Alpuche-Aranda, C, Bonifaz, LC, Arriaga-Pizano, L, Pastelin-Palacios, R, Isibasi, A & López-Macías, C 2016, 'Antibody persistence in adults two years after vaccination with an H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus-like particle vaccine', PLoS ONE, vol. 11, n.º 2, e0150146. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150146

Antibody persistence in adults two years after vaccination with an H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus-like particle vaccine. / Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Pérez-Toledo, Marisol; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino.

En: PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, N.º 2, e0150146, 02.2016.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

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T1 - Antibody persistence in adults two years after vaccination with an H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus-like particle vaccine

AU - Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban

AU - Pérez-Toledo, Marisol

AU - Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

AU - Núñez-Valencia, Adriana

AU - Boscó-Gárate, Ilka

AU - Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo

AU - Lara-Puente, Horacio

AU - Espitia, Clara

AU - Alpuche-Aranda, Celia

AU - Bonifaz, Laura C.

AU - Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes

AU - Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo

AU - Isibasi, Armando

AU - López-Macías, Constantino

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

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Valero-Pacheco N, Pérez-Toledo M, Villasís-Keever MÁ, Núñez-Valencia A, Boscó-Gárate I, Lozano-Dubernard B y otros. Antibody persistence in adults two years after vaccination with an H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus-like particle vaccine. PLoS ONE. 2016 feb;11(2). e0150146. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150146