Actin monoubiquitylation is induced in plants in response to pathogens and symbionts

E. Dantán-González, Yvonne Jane Rosenstein Azoulay, C. Quinto, F. Sánchez

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

27 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Most dramatic examples of actin reorganization have been described during host - microbe interactions. Plasticity of actin is, in part, due to posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation or ubiquitylation. Here, we show for the first time that actins found in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris are modified transiently during nodule development by monoubiquitylation. This finding was extended to root nodules of other legumes and to other plants infected with mycorrhiza or plant pathogens such as members of the genera Pseudomonas and Phytophthora. However, neither viral infections nor diverse stressful conditions (heat shock, wounding, or osmotic stress) induced this response. Additionally, this phenomenon was mimicked by the addition of a yeast elicitor or H2O2 to Phaseolus vulgaris suspension culture cells. This modification seems to provide increased stability of the microfilaments to proteolytic degradation and seems to be found in fractions in which the actin cytoskeleton is associated with membranes. All together, these data suggest that actin monoubiquitylation may be considered an effector mechanism of a general plant response against microbes.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)1267-1273
Número de páginas7
PublicaciónMolecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Volumen14
N.º11
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 ene 2001

Huella dactilar

symbionts
actin
plant response
Actins
Phaseolus
pathogens
root nodules
microfilaments
Actin Cytoskeleton
Phaseolus vulgaris
Mycorrhizae
Phytophthora
microorganisms
Osmoregulation
Ubiquitination
post-translational modification
Virus Diseases
Post Translational Protein Processing
osmotic stress
Pseudomonas

Citar esto

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Actin monoubiquitylation is induced in plants in response to pathogens and symbionts. / Dantán-González, E.; Rosenstein Azoulay, Yvonne Jane; Quinto, C.; Sánchez, F.

En: Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, Vol. 14, N.º 11, 01.01.2001, p. 1267-1273.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículo

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